Archive for the ‘Jane Austen’ Tag

10 Signs You Watch Too Many Costume Dramas   Leave a comment

 

1. You have started a one-woman campaign to bring back the cravat;

2. You can keep up with the deluge of Jane Austen adaptations or films/ series about her, and have seen most of them;

3. You have coerced your significant other into letting you call him Mr. Darcy-in public.

4. You deliberately go out walking in stormy weather in the hope of spraining your ankle and being rescued by a dashing gentleman on horseback;

5. When you dream about your ideal man, he is wearing riding breeches and a top hat;

6. You have completely redecorated your home in the Regency or Victorian style;

7. You are inexplicably drawn to swarthy, dark haired men who torment you with their moody ways and lack of communication skills;

8. You deplore the fact that qualities such as honour, integrity and loyalty have little meaning in our society;

9. You greet people (even your own family) by saying: “Ah, good morning, sir, madam. ‘Tis a fine morning, is it not?”

10. You can name about 95% of the costume dramas shown in this you tube clip:

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Pride & Prejudice (1995)   1 comment

Oh, that immortal wet shirt!

Among the many things the Brits are good at, the one I am most grateful to them for is their ability to consistently make quality film and television- particularly costume dramas.

Although there had been a good number of successful film and tv adaptations of classic books before the BBC decided to tackle Jane Austen’s Pride & Prejudice, somehow they all paled into insignificance next to this series which has become the benchmark for all successive adaptations to compare themselves to.

It not only launched Colin Firth’s career as a reluctant pin-up and movie star, but also made Andrew Davies one of the most sought-after script writers in Britain. Add to these elements the talented Jennifer Ehle as Elizabeth Bennett, a little unspoken sexual tension between the two leads to keep the audience happy and high-quality film which gave the production a cinematic quality and you had one of the most-watched period dramas of all time.

Most lovers of classic adaptations would consider it to be among their favourites, and for a series that was made more than a decade ago, it has held up remarkably well on subsequent viewings.

For those of you who appreciate well-scripted shows with well-rounded characters in beautiful surroundings, I highly recommend this version of P&P!

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